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Superhero Topic

AMELIA EARHART
On July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart flew away from a town called Lae in the South Pacific. Earhart was attempting to circumnavigate the globe. After taking off from Lae, she disappeared. The Superhero Historians will investigate her life, her final flight, and the possible outcomes to that flight.
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Tuesday, April 08, 2008

Flight to Africa

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

Amelia Earhart flew over a big stretch of water when she left South America for Africa.  She was the first woman to make the eastward flight over the South Atlantic.  She landed in St. Louis.  No, not the one in Missouri, the one in Senegal.  Senegal is in Africa and St. Louis was a part of French West Africa.  St. Louis was the headquarters of Air France.  Earhart actually decided during her flight to go there.  She didn’t like the look of the route to the south, so she just headed a bit left and landed in St. Louis instead of Dakar.

By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Wednesday, April 02, 2008

Theories

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Let’s break up the posts a bit and start talking about some theories on what happened to Amelia Earhart.  One of the more widely accepted theories is that Earhart landed in the ocean and sank.  At 7:42 a.m. the morning of her disappearance Earhart radioed “We must be on you, but cannot see you—but gas is running low. Have been unable to reach you by radio. We are flying at 1,000 feet.” Many researchers do believe that she ran out of gas before reaching Howland Island.  In fact, British aviation historian Roy Nesbit thinks that Earhart’s plane was not fully fueled at Lae.

By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Monday, March 31, 2008

South America

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

Amelia Earhart now entered the South American part of her journey. This part would also see her cross the Equator. She made 4 stops in South America: Caripito, Paramaribo, Fortaleza, and Natal. The last two cities are in Brazil, while the first is in Venezuela, and the second was in Dutch Guiana. Dutch Guiana is now known as Suriname. Paramaribo is the capital of Suriname and most of the country’s population lives there. It is well known for its diverse population. Just like Paramaribo, all three other South American cities sit on the the coast. Natal, in Brazil, is called the City of the Sun. Natal is not a big city, but is becoming a major tourist area and is said to be the safest capital city in Brazil. Fortaleza, also in Brazil, mimics its neighbor with safety and tourism. Fortaleza is a major beach city. Caripito is in Venezuela. There is a lot of oil activity in this city.

By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Friday, March 28, 2008

San Juan, Puerto Rico

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

On June 1, 1937, Amelia Earhart landed in San Juan.  San Juan is the capital of Puerto Rico.  Ponce de Leon was the first governor of Puerto Rico, named so after he founded the first settlement there in 1508.  That settlement was called Caparra.  Hmm, you are thinking about Ponce de Leon.  Why does he sound familiar?  Remember the legend that Ponce de Leon searched Florida for the Fountain of Youth?  It’s the same guy!  The Spanish Empire used San Juan as a port and stop before continuing on to the New World.  In 1898 the Treaty of Paris had Spain give Puerto Rico to the United States.  What is San Juan like today?  Read more!


By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Monday, March 24, 2008

Miami, Florida

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

Miami, Florida is where Amelia Earhart left the United States on June 1, 1937.  Once again her airplane needed some maintenance before taking off.  The plane was having problems with the auto-pilot and with the radio transmitter.  They fixed the auto-pilot and got rid of a long antennae causing the transmitter problems.  At 5:55 a.m. Earhart and Noonan took off from Miami and the United States.  Let’s take a short look at Miami.


By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Monday, March 17, 2008

Tucson, AZ

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

On her journey around the world, Amelia Earhart made a stop in Tucson, AZ.  The heat in Arizona was too mush for one of her engines.  However, all it needed was a good cleaning.  Let’s take a look at Tucson.


By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Oakland, CA

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

Earhart started in Oakland, CA.  This is where she started the first attempt too.  However, this time she would be flying in the opposite direction.  Let’s talk about Oakland.


By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Monday, March 10, 2008

The Route of Amelia Earhart

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

I want to spend some time talking about Earhart’s route.  I’ll talk a bit about the places she flew to.  How are they different from one another and what may be different about the location today.  Of course I’ll also talk about the food.  Come on, you knew I would.  Before I get on to that you need to check out this map from Purdue University’s Amelia Earhart collection.  This map shows her route.  It is incredible.  A great resource.  Scroll at the bottom to see the whole map.  You can also click on the city names to find out more and see pictures of Earhart from that city.  Seriously, “awesome” is the word that comes to mind.  Here is the link.

By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Wednesday, March 05, 2008

Earhart’s First Attempt

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Did you know that Amelia Earhart made two attempt to fly around the world?  On the first attempt she started in Oakland, CA and flew to Honolulu, HI.  When taking off from Hawaii for the second stretch the plane crashed.  The flight was canceled and the plane shipped back to California.  This first attempt started on March 17, 1937.

The crash in 1937 was called ground-looping.  Ground-looping means that one wing rises suddenly and the other wing can touch the ground.  That sounds pretty scary.  Earhart and witnesses say that a tire blew on takeoff.  Paul Mantz, who was on-board the flight, says it was pilot error.

The first attempt went from East to West while the second flight attempt went from West to East.

By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Tuesday, March 04, 2008

Earhart’s Remains?

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

This is a short clip from the Biography Channel. Is the mystery of Amelia Earhart solved?  A lot of questions still remain.

By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Friday, February 29, 2008

Itasca

Alistair Flush, Military Historian

Okay, pay attention to whati I’m about to tell you.  I’ll keep it short.  The United States Coast Guard sent its ship Itasca to help Earhart with navigation to Howland Island.  The ship was set to be in radio contact with Earhart’s plane for that section of her flight.  We will go over what happened later.  Now, I wanted to introduce you to the ship.

The Itasca was 250 feet long.  The ship launched on November 16, 1929 and was commissioned on July 12, 1930.  On September 28, 1950 it was sold for scrap metal.  The ship cost $900,000.

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By: Alistair Flush, Military Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Wednesday, February 27, 2008

Earhart Radio Transcripts

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

Purdue University has a really great Amelia Earhart collection.  Here is a link (click this sentence) to a scanned image of message from the United States Coast Guard about how Earhart will communicate to them from her radio. Alistair will talk more about Earhart and the Coast Guard.  For now, click around the Purdue site and enjoy.

By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Friday, February 22, 2008

Anita Snook

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

Amelia Earhart had to learn how to fly from someone.  That someone was another pioneer pilot named Anita Snook.  People called her Neta.  She was born on Valentines Day in 1896.  She was rejected from the first flight school she applied to because she was female.  However, she finally began learning to fly at the Davenport Flying School in Iowa.  In 1921 Amelia Earhart approached Snook and asked her for lessons.  Earhart’s parents would only let her learn from a female.  It cost her $500 for 12 hours.  During the training Snook and Earhart became great friends.

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By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Tuesday, February 19, 2008

Amelia Earhart and the Talon Zipper

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

We love a topic that is still in the news!  The International Group for Historical Aircraft Recovery is trying to find out if an old zipper belongs to Amelia Earhart.  Oh yeah, they found the zipper on Nikumaroro.  Oh yeah, Nikumaroro is a tiny atoll in the Pacific Ocean.  It would have been in Amelia Earhart’s flight path when she vanished.  Amazing.  The story is here.  (Hint, click the entire sentence.)

The company that made the zipper, Talon, has gone through many changes but still exists today.

By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: AMELIA EARHART
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Monday, February 18, 2008

Presidents’ Day

Pierce Hawking, The Founding Father

Happy Presidents’ Day.  A holiday in honor of President Washington’s birthday it is the first federal holiday for an American citizen!

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By: Pierce Hawking, The Founding Father
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