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Superhero Topic

AMELIA EARHART
On July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart flew away from a town called Lae in the South Pacific. Earhart was attempting to circumnavigate the globe. After taking off from Lae, she disappeared. The Superhero Historians will investigate her life, her final flight, and the possible outcomes to that flight.
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Monday, October 16, 2006

The Big Apple

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

Ahh, New York City, the city that never sleeps.  Home to the Yankees and the Knicks.  Also, I may add, great pizza all over the city.  I thought salmon could never be beat… well it can’t be, but that New York City pizza.  Hmmm.  Sorry, let’s get back on topic.  New York was also home to both Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr.

Hamilton owned a country estate he named “The Grange.” This estate and surrounding 32 acres stood several miles outside the city in what is now Harlem, it cost him $22,220.  Aaron Burr owned a mansion named “Richmond Hill” which was also occupied by John Adams and used as a headquarters by George Washington during the Revolutionary War.

Here are some other facts you’ll find interesting. New York City’s population at the time was around 65,000 people.  Today its population is over 8 million.  Duels were illegal in New York.  In 1800, Aaron Burr ran the New York political machine called Tammany Hall.  Tammany Hall helped Burr secure the Vice Presidency.  William “Boss” Tweed made Tammany Hall even more famous, or I should say infamous, during the 1850’s due to his corruption.  His illegal activities were highlighted by political cartoonist Thomas Nast, the creator of the elephants for Republicans and the donkey for Democrats.  But we will save that talk for a later topic.

Just an FYI, the National Park Service keeps “The Grange” as a historic location.  Hmm, pepperoni and cheese just wafted through the air.  See ya!

By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: HAMILTON - BURR DUEL
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Sunday, October 15, 2006

Two Voices to Stop Duels

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

Although dueling was popular around 1804, there were many people who spoke out against the practice. The Catholic Church rallied against dueling. Dueling was even illegal in many states. However, the duel was still very popular with politicians and people of the day. Even Andrew Jackson, the 7th President of the United States took part in a duel. A mighty scandalous duel at that, but we’ll save that for a later date.

So, the Catholic Church and state laws were not the only voices in opposition to duels. Both George Washington and Benjamin Franklin frowned on the art of the duel. Franklin said about duels, “murderous practice… they decide nothing.” Washington’s reason for disliking the practice may have been more beneficial to him as the General of the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Washington could not afford to lose troops to duels, he needed the manpower. It is interesting that Alexander Hamilton took part in duels while the man he looked up to, Washington, discouraged them.

By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: HAMILTON - BURR DUEL
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The Code Duello

Alistair Flush, Military Historian

Despite what Mr. Phineas Pollyphus says about starting at the beginning, with the Federalists and other political leanings, the rest of the Superhero Historians have made the correct choice in letting me first describe the Code Duello. That is, the rules for a duel. After all, this topic is about a duel. Mr. Pollyphus, or Political Pigeon, can talk politics all he wants after I get done here.

You may notice that I am the Military Historian, yet the Code Duello is not strictly a military topic. Well, this month leaves me a little bit short on topics, so I volunteered to discuss this part of the duel between Hamilton and Burr. Let’s not waste anymore time.

The Code Duello was written up in Ireland in the year 1777. It was adopted throughout Ireland, England, and the United States. Although, duels in the United States varied a bit from the Irish version. A version for the United States was written by John Wilson, Governor of South Carolina, in 1838, but since this duel took place in 1804, it was still based on the Irish version. The Code Duello had 25 total rules. These rules included: who could apologize when, when a duel would be fought, and where a duel would be fought.

Duels were all about keeping your honor. A person would challenge another person to a duel after being insulted. At this point the challenged party could either apologize or accept the duel. The challenged party would choose the weapons, location, and the time for the duel. Each participant would then act through a person called a “second.” The second’s main job was to try and resolve the duel peacefully. Apologies could be offered after a round of missed shots. Although, the person who made the initial insult had to be the first to apologize. After two rounds of shots apologies could come in any order.

Duels were common back in those days and the chances of injury were small. Both Burr and Hamilton had been in duels before they met in 1804. The pistols used were very inaccurate. Since honor could be restored with little chance of injury, duels were often undertaken.

A few interesting facts about the duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton. First, it was considered dishonorable to take longer than three seconds to fire your shot. After the duel on July 11, 1804, there are conflicting accounts of the time lapse between shots fired. Aaron Burr may have taken more than three seconds to fire a response. Second, it was considered dishonorable to miss on purpose. Alexander Hamilton may have missed on purpose. This is taken from a letter he wrote the night before the duel: “I have resolved, if our interview is conducted in the usual manner, and it pleases God to give me the opportunity, to reserve and throw away my first fire, and I have thoughts even of reserving my second fire.”

By: Alistair Flush, Military Historian
Topic: HAMILTON - BURR DUEL
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Saturday, October 07, 2006

First Topic

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

Hi everyone, Rhonda here.  The rest of the Historians picked me to let you all know what our first topic will be.  Isn’t that great?  Our first topic will be the duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr.  We will start blogging about the duel on October 15.  If you haven’t done so already, scroll down to read all of our welcome posts.  Also, check around our site and get familiar with who we are.  See you soon!

By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: HAMILTON - BURR DUEL
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Pierce Hawking’s Dream

Pierce Hawking, The Founding Father

The Superhero Historians was Pierce Hawking’s dream come true.  He would be so proud to see it now.  We hope you enjoy your time spent on our site.  Every piece of history that you learn, brings a bigger smile to Pierce’s beak.

By: Pierce Hawking, The Founding Father
Topic: WELCOME TO SUPERHERO HISTORIANS
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Amazing People

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

I can’t get enough of people.  People are amazing.  The things that you can do when you put your minds to it.  Unbelievable.  I’ll tell you all about the people behind the history.  Everyone knows about the big names, Lincoln and Washington, but I’ll let you in on the lesser known names.  Some of those names are the real movers behind history.

By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: WELCOME TO SUPERHERO HISTORIANS
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Words On Paper

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

There’s nothing I love better than words on paper: the smell of ink, the crinkle crackle of paper beneath your paws, the gentle fading of parchment from white to brown.  It’s so exciting.  Our entire history is played out on paper.  On paper, can you believe it?  It’s all there for anyone to see.  Sure, you need to go through the stacks and research.  That takes time.  Don’t worry about it, I’ll do it for you.

By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: WELCOME TO SUPERHERO HISTORIANS
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Politics

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

How I love politics.  Everything that goes into politics, I love.  Love.  Debate, power plays, votes, vetoes, bills, campaigns, and the people who make all that happen, it’s great.  I’ll let you in on all the politics behind the history.  I will.  I’ll let you in on it.

By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: WELCOME TO SUPERHERO HISTORIANS
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It’s All About Location

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

No matter what happens, there has to be a place for it to happen.  Right?  That’s why I’m here.  While most people focus on the action, or what is going on in front of them, I will focus on where it is happening.  While the Gettysburg Address is fascinating on its own, don’t you think it’s interesting to find out about the town?  I do.  So, thanks for stopping by.  I’ll be able to give you information that is both useful and entertaining.  I think I smell salmon, see ya soon!

By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: WELCOME TO SUPERHERO HISTORIANS
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Pay Attention

Alistair Flush, Military Historian

The military is my expertise.  No matter what we are discussing, I’ll tell you what the military has to do with it.  Thanks for paying attention.  You are dismissed.

By: Alistair Flush, Military Historian
Topic: WELCOME TO SUPERHERO HISTORIANS
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Welcome

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Hi everyone!  Thanks for coming to our corner of the web.  Each month I will blog about the different inventions or cool things that have to do with our topic.  For example, if our topic is about space exploration, I would talk about the space shuttle, or the astronaut’s suit.  Again, thanks for stopping by and make sure to come back when we start teaching history.

By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: WELCOME TO SUPERHERO HISTORIANS
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