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AMELIA EARHART
On July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart flew away from a town called Lae in the South Pacific. Earhart was attempting to circumnavigate the globe. After taking off from Lae, she disappeared. The Superhero Historians will investigate her life, her final flight, and the possible outcomes to that flight.
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Thursday, October 04, 2007

Happy Birthday Sputnik

Pierce Hawking, The Founding Father

Happy 50th birthday to Sputnik.  Click here for Sputnik stats.

By: Pierce Hawking, The Founding Father
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Wednesday, October 03, 2007

Orbiting the Earth and Landing

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

NASA had finally succeeded in placing a human being in space.  They did it twice.  Now it was time to see how a human would react to orbiting the Earth.  That was one of the main goals of the third manned Project Mercury flight.  Guess what another objective was.  To be able to find the capsule when it landed.

That sounds kind of funny.  When you think about it though, it makes sense.  The first two manned missions had rockets go up and come down.  This mission had the rocket go up and then circle the entire Earth three times before coming down.  There was definitely the possibility of the capsule coming down somewhere where nobody would see it.  The capsule did come down short of where it was planned.  That was because the scientists did not figure on weight loss due to used fuel.  Click here to see a map of where John Glenn landed! You will have to zoom around to find land!

By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Monday, October 01, 2007

Rescued from the Atlantic

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Remember how the hatch on Grissom’s capsule exploded?  The capsule sat on the ocean floor for almost 38 years!  It was 15,000 feet deep.  That is deeper than the Titanic sat.  In July of 1999 they finally recovered the Liberty Bell 7 from the Atlantic.  Scientists from the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center helped repair and clean the capsule.  They took apart 26,000 parts to clean them.  Then put it back together.  Talk about your all-time repair project!  You can see the Liberty Bell 7 on display at the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas.

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By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Thursday, September 27, 2007

Liberty Bell 7

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Virgil “Gus” Grissom’s sub-orbital flight lasted longer than Shepard’s did.  By 9 seconds!  These first two Project Mercury manned space flights were very brief.  Grissom’s lasted 15 minutes and 37 seconds.


By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Monday, September 24, 2007

Gus Grissom

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

Vigil “Gus” Grissom was born on April 3, 1926 in Mitchell, Indiana.  He took the second manned flight in Project Mercury.  Grissom’s flight was sub-orbital, like Shepard’s.


By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Thursday, September 20, 2007

Capsule with a View

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Everyone likes a good view.  The Mercury 7 astronauts wanted a view too.  For the first mission into space, Alan Shepard viewed through a periscope.  Well, one of the improvements that the astronauts asked for was a window.  They got it!  The engineers who worked on Project Mercury didn’t think the window was necessary.

Here was Alan Shepards view of space:

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By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Monday, September 17, 2007

Freedom 7

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Each of the Mercury astronauts got the opportunity to choose a name.  Alan Shepard chose Freedom 7.  Let’s go over his flight.


By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Friday, September 14, 2007

Upon Landing

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

Okay, this is really neat.  Have you ever flown in an airplane?  Remember the instructions on what do do in case of an emergency?  They even have diagrams of what to do.  Well, the Project Mercury astronauts had a diagram too!  Their capsule came down in the ocean and they had to know how to get out of it safely.  They called it “Egress Procedures.” Check it out by clicking here.

By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Wednesday, September 12, 2007

Alan Shepard

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

Alan Shepard was the first American astronaut in space.  He was born on November 18, 1923 and died on July 21, 1998.  He graduated Annapolis and became a Navy test pilot and fighter pilot.  He logged more than 8,000 hours flying time.


By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Monday, September 10, 2007

Survival Training

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

You can imagine that training for Project Mercury would include all sorts of things.  Did you know that the Mercury astronauts had to survive in the Nevada desert as part of the training?


By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Friday, September 07, 2007

Colonel Yuri Gagarin

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

First the animals blasted into space, next comes the humans.  Colonel Yuri Gagarin entered space on April 12, 1961.  The Russian cosmonaut beat the United States by a month!  Talk about a race.  If this were the hundred-yard dash the Soviet Union would have clipped the tape about a half second before the United States.  Awesome.


By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Wednesday, September 05, 2007

Project Mercury

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Project Mercury was NASA’s first program to put man into space.  You read a bit about Laika, the Russian dog that launched into space.  There were also mice and monkeys who flew into the atmosphere.  Now it was time for NASA to have humans fly into space.


By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Tuesday, September 04, 2007

3…2…1…Watch!

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

You can view a shuttle or rocket launching into space.  Sure you can.  Watch a launch from the Kennedy Space Center.  This website has the schedule of launches.  Later on I will tell you more about the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

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By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Friday, August 31, 2007

Space Pen

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Here is something interesting, the first astronauts used pencils to write in space.  Makes sense to me.  They needed to write things down and with zero gravity, pens would not work.  The story of the space pen is an interesting one where technology and money collide.


By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Wednesday, August 29, 2007

Laika

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

First came Sputnik, and then came Laika.  What is Laika?  Think of man’s best friend.  That’s right; Laika was a dog that the Soviet Union sent into space!


By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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