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Superhero Topic

AMELIA EARHART
On July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart flew away from a town called Lae in the South Pacific. Earhart was attempting to circumnavigate the globe. After taking off from Lae, she disappeared. The Superhero Historians will investigate her life, her final flight, and the possible outcomes to that flight.
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Monday, August 27, 2007

NASA

Alistair Flush, Military Historian

What do you think the military has to do with the space race?  I know you are wondering what I’m doing here.  Space is all about science and technology.  Well, let me take you back to the 1950’s and Sputnik 1.


By: Alistair Flush, Military Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Wednesday, August 22, 2007

Sputnik 1

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Here is a picture of Sputnik 1:

image

Pretty cool, huh?  It weighed 184.3 pounds.  It took a little over 96 minutes to orbit the Earth.  It had a 23 inch diameter and transmitted radio signals back to Earth.  Very neat.  It orbited the Earth 1,440 times.

By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Monday, August 20, 2007

On Your Mark…

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

We got a little excited here at Superhero Historians after we did the post about the flag on the moon. That seemed like a good next topic… well, not the flag on the moon, but space. Space and how we got there.

How did the Space Race start? On October 4, 1957 the Soviet Union put Sputnik I into space, but it started a bit before then. In 1952 the International Council of Scientific Unions declared July 1, 1957 to December 31, 1958 as the International Geophysical Year. In 1954 they called for artificial satellites to be launched that could map the Earth’s surface. The Space Race was on…

By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: THE SPACE RACE
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Thursday, August 16, 2007

United States Flag Round-Up

Pierce Hawking, The Founding Father

We hope that you’ve enjoyed our United States flag topic.  There is still a ton of information out there on the flag, so go check it out if you are interested.  As always, please contact us with questions or comments… even to say “hello.” We appreciate your readership and your passing Superhero Historians along to other history buffs!

By: Pierce Hawking, The Founding Father
Topic: UNITED STATES FLAG
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Tuesday, August 14, 2007

Fighting Quaker

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

The Fighting Quakers were those Quakers who supported the Revolution.  They were differed with other Quakers because of their pro-war stance.  Betsy Ross was a Fighting Quaker.  British troops even occupied her house in Philadelphia!  In 1783 the Free Quakers opened up their own meetinghouse in Philadelphia.  In 1834 Betsy Ross, at that time Betsy Claypoole, and fellow Fighting Quaker John Price Wetherill were the only two worshipping at the meetinghouse.  They decided to close the meetinghouse for good.  During the 1950’s the building housed plumbing supplies.

“By General Subscription for the FREE QUAKERS
Erected in the YEAR of OUR LORD 1783 of the EMPIRE 8.”
– Dedication Stone at Fighting Quakers Meeting House.

By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: UNITED STATES FLAG
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Thursday, August 09, 2007

56 Stars!

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

Did you know that designs exist for flags with up to 56 stars?  No, really, 56 stars!  It would be a staggered star design.  The United States Army Institute of Heraldry helps design flags, and has the designs for the 56 star flag.


By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: UNITED STATES FLAG
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Tuesday, August 07, 2007

The Jack

Alistair Flush, Military Historian

The jack of the United States is our maritime flag.  The U.S. Navy and Coast Guard use the jack, flying it from the bow of ships.  Although the jack keeps changing as history changes, it will look really familiar to you.


By: Alistair Flush, Military Historian
Topic: UNITED STATES FLAG
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Friday, August 03, 2007

Folding the Flag

Alistair Flush, Military Historian

Did you know that there is a proper way to fold the United States flag?  Well listen up and I’ll tell you how to do it.


By: Alistair Flush, Military Historian
Topic: UNITED STATES FLAG
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Wednesday, August 01, 2007

First Official Flag

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

Flags, flags, and more flags all over the United States.  Did you know that there are a number of places where the flag must be flown at all times?  Sure there are.  Places like the White House and the Washington Monument.  That makes sense.  What about Martinsville, New Jersey?  Not sure about that one?  Well, it’s an important one.  I’ll tell you all about it.


By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: UNITED STATES FLAG
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Monday, July 30, 2007

Protest

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

The United States flag is a very powerful symbol.  It flies with pride on many occasions.  It flies in remembrance and honor on other days.  The country has also united behind the flag.  Bring everyone together.  However, protesters have used this powerful symbol.

People who are unhappy with the United States government often protest using the flag.  Sometimes people fly the flag upside down as a sign of protest.  An upside down flag is meant as a military distress symbol.  However, people sometimes fly the flag upside down to protest the government, to say that the government is in “distress.” Flag burning is another form of protest.  Another way.  Remember that there are flag burning rituals performed to retire an old and worn out flag.  However, flag burning in protest has nothing to do with this. 

The Supreme Court ruled, in Texas vs. Johnson, that the First Amendment protects flag burning.  The Supreme Court ruled by a vote of 5 – 4.  The majority opinion saw flag burning as “expressive conduct,” or free speech.  One of the minority opinions said that Johnson, who burned the flag, was punished for the way he expressed his opinion, not for the opinion itself.  Not for his opinion.


By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: UNITED STATES FLAG
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Thursday, July 26, 2007

Half-Mast

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Sometimes you will notice a United States flag that is not at the top of a flagpole.  That is because the flag is flying at “half-mast.” We fly flags at half-mast to remember people who have died.


By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: UNITED STATES FLAG
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Tuesday, July 24, 2007

Order a flag.

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

Have you ever heard of the Capitol Flag Program?  This is cool.  Very cool.  In 1937 a member of Congress asked for a Capitol flag.  Over time the Capitol Flag Program has spread and used to honor organizations and special holidays.  A new flag is flown over the Capitol every day, weather permitting, except Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s.  Each flag flies from a special flagpole. 


By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: UNITED STATES FLAG
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Friday, July 20, 2007

Iwo Jima

Alistair Flush, Military Historian

image

I know you recognize this picture.  It is Joe Rosenthal’s famous picture of the flag raising on Iwo Jima.  This is actually the second flag raised on Iwo Jima.  The first one was a lot smaller than this one.  The Marines placed the first flag on February 23, 1945 after they climbed to the top of Mount Suribachi.  There is a bit of controversy regarding the famous picture above.  Joe Rosenthal actually shot another photo of Marines posing in front of the flag.  After the famous photo went public, someone asked him if he posed the picture.  Thinking they were referring to the second one he took, he said “yes.” Many mistakenly thought he posed the famous flag raising picture.  He didn’t.  He actually got lucky snapping the picture.  He was busy trying to pile rocks to get a good view for the picture, when he saw them raising it.  He quickly shot the picture without looking through the viewfinder! 


By: Alistair Flush, Military Historian
Topic: UNITED STATES FLAG
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Wednesday, July 18, 2007

Flag Code

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

Did you know that there is a Flag Code that tells us everything we should and shouldn’t do with our flag?  This code tells us how to display the flag properly, when it should be displayed, how to treat the flag, and even how to dispose of a flag that is old.  Did you know that you should not wear a t-shirt with the flag on it?  You can put a flag patch on a shirt, like the military or sports teams.  Another part of the flag code is that the flag must be properly illuminated at night if being flown.  There are all sorts of interesting and amazing rules and customs concerning our flag.  Read the entire Flag Code here, at the American Legion site.  Click on the topics on the left side!  Enjoy.

By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: UNITED STATES FLAG
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Monday, July 16, 2007

Hawaii and Alaska

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

Each star on the flag is a state.  Count them up: 1, 2, 3… 50.  Good job!  Remember that states were added all through history.  The United States didn’t start with 50!  A law passed in 1818 said that a star had to be added on July 4 after a state was added.  Unfortunately, this law didn’t say how the star should be added.  So in 1958 when Alaska and Hawaii were going to become states, people sent in different flag designs.  President Eisenhower set up a committee to decide on the design.  They decided on what we see today, the rows of stars. 

Here is a design sent in by Donald Edwards.  Pretty neat, huh?

image

By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: UNITED STATES FLAG
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