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AMELIA EARHART
On July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart flew away from a town called Lae in the South Pacific. Earhart was attempting to circumnavigate the globe. After taking off from Lae, she disappeared. The Superhero Historians will investigate her life, her final flight, and the possible outcomes to that flight.
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Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY

On December 16, 1773 Bostonians rebelled against the Tea Act by boarding British ships carrying tea and dumping the cargo into the harbor. Find out who was behind this, why they did it, what the results were, and why some of them dressed like American Indians.

Monday, May 21, 2007

Taxes

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

“No taxation without representation!” Most hear that and think of the American Revolution.  It was a popular saying during that time in America.  But what does it mean?


By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Thursday, May 17, 2007

Boycott the Tea!

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Boycotts are one of the oldest ways to let people, companies, or governments know that you are unhappy with something they are doing.  The colonists boycotted British tea.  Tea was a very popular drink in the colonies.  So instead of not drinking any tea, the colonists would drink smuggled tea or tea made from other plants.  They drank Labrador tea and Balsamic Hyperion that they made from dried raspberry leaves.  They also drank coffee!


By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Tuesday, May 15, 2007

Handbills

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

Nowadays technology that makes communication simple surrounds us.  If you want to talk to your best friend you can: knock on his door, call him on a landline, call him on a cell phone, email him, text him, hire a sky writing plane…. Well, you get the idea.  To communicate to a larger audience, like an entire city, people use radio, television, the Internet, newspapers, and yes, sky writing planes.  On November 28, 1773, when the tea filled Dartmouth entered Boston Harbor, Patriots thought quickly of the best way to rally the people to meet.  The following day handbills were posted all over Boston screaming, “Friends! Brethren! Countrymen! That worst of Plagues, the detested tea shipped for this port by the East India Company, is now arrived in the Harbor; the hour of destruction, or manly opposition to the machinations of Tyranny stares you in the face.  Every friend to his country, to himself and to posterity, is now called upon to meet at Faneuil Hall, at nine o’clock THIS DAY (at which time the bells will ring), to make united and successful resistance to this last, worst, and most destructive measure of administration.” The handbills worked so well that the crowd moved from Faneuil Hall to the Old South Meeting House, which held more people.  Talk about the power of the pen!

By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Monday, May 14, 2007

John Hancock

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

“Put your John Hancock right there!” Ever hear that expression?  It means putting your signature on a piece of paper.  John Hancock is famous for his signature, the big sprawling one at the bottom of the Declaration of Independence.  I guess he figured if he was the first signer, he could take up as much room as possible.  Although, when you are someone who significantly bankrolled the revolution in Boston, you probably deserve a big space for your “John Hancock.”


By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Wednesday, May 09, 2007

The Green Dragon

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

What does a dragon have to do with the American Revolution?  No, it’s not a riddle, just a question that is still not fully answered by history.  The Green Dragon Tavern in Boston, marked by a weather colored dragon above the door, sits as a site often called the “headquarters of the American Revolution.” Upstairs from the tavern was a Masonic Lodge, where men like Paul Revere and Dr. Warren met.  Paul Revere remarks that, “About thirty persons, chiefly North-End mechanics, had agreed to watch the movements of the British soldiers and the Tories, in anticipation of their descent on Concord.  These patriots met at the Green Dragon Tavern.  We were so careful, that our meetings should be kept secret, that every time we met, every person swore upon the Bible that they (he) would not discover any of our transactions, but to Messrs. Hancock, Drs. Warren and Church, and one or two more leaders.  They took turns to watch the soldiers, two by two, by patrolling the streets all night.” The Green Dragon held many secret political meetings.  It is said that one such meeting planned the Boston Tea Party.


By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Friday, May 04, 2007

Paul Revere

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

“Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere”

Paul Revere is most remembered for his famous midnight ride warning that the “Regulars are coming!” However, there is a lot more to Paul Revere than just that one ride.  Funny enough, Paul Revere probably gets too much credit for that midnight ride, but that’s a story for another time.  For now, let’s just give a little background on Paul Revere.


By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Thursday, May 03, 2007

British East India Company

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Even the simple act of drinking tea was a statement on freedom.  At that time, Great Britain acted as the sole importer of legal tea to the American colonies.  While in Great Britain the British East India Company owned the monopoly on tea imports.  Put two and two together.  You have a widely popular product that can only be purchased through one place making tea very expensive.  The answer to this problem was smuggling illegal tea into both Great Britain and the American colonies.  Tea smuggling meant serious problems for the British East India Company, leaving them with a decline in consumers and an overstock of tea.  Not wanting the company to go bankrupt, due to loyalties and the money owed to the government, Great Britain created the Tea Act, allowing the company to sell tea directly to the American colonies at a radically reduced price.  Phineas will go into the Tea Act a bit later.  When ships from the British East India Company, stocked with tea, set sail for the colonies, meetings were held in Boston on steps to take.  This all leads up to the Tea Party.


By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Wednesday, May 02, 2007

Committees of Correspondence

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

The Boston Tea Party puts a lot of focus on Boston, but most of the leaders of the Revolution were politically savvy enough to know that they needed full colonial support to rally against Great Britain.  Colonial assemblies and various local governments started committees of correspondence who would carry the opinions and thoughts of their assembly to other committees of correspondence throughout the colonies.  In this manner people in Virginia knew how the people of Massachusetts felt about certain British policies, and they could come together on their opinions.  These committees of correspondence were very effective in gathering support against such laws as the Stamp Act and in putting together the First Continental Congress in 1774.  The Sons of Liberty, widely seen as the actors behind the Tea Party, helped garner support for their cause through the committees of correspondence.  It is very clear that even though the organization against Great Britain was often loose and disorganized, the committees of correspondence had a large effect on solidifying the cause for revolution.

By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Tuesday, May 01, 2007

Big Bad Ben

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

We Superhero Historians are fond of many people, both living people and those now residing in history.  However, we are particularly fond of one individual.  Can you guess?  Look around the site and see if you can figure it out.  That’s right!  Ben Franklin is our main man.  It is with great pleasure that I make the first Superhero Historian entry on Big Bad Ben Franklin: printer, writer, scientist, and totally bad dude.


By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Friday, April 27, 2007

Political Engravings

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

One of the greatest ways to take the pulse of society at a certain time in history is to take a look at the political cartoons during that time.  What are political cartoons?  They are drawings, usually in newspapers, that contain a political message.  You will see an example of a cartoon around the time of the Boston Tea Party.  Boy, these cartoons are seriously sweet!


By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Thursday, April 26, 2007

Bostson Harbor aka “The Teapot”

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

There is almost nothing as exciting as a big city harbor: ships, damp salt smells hanging in the air, and food everywhere.  Boston Harbor is a great place to visit, especially on a great spring day!  Throughout the history of North America, Boston Harbor has served a major purpose.  Before the colonies it acted as a major trading post for the Native Americans who lived nearby.  Once the colonists came it became a major shipping port for goods coming from England.  As the colonies spread southward, Boston Harbor’s importance decreased slightly, but it remains, to this day, one of the United State’s most important harbors.


By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Wednesday, April 25, 2007

French and Indian War

Alistair Flush, Military Historian

Pay attention readers!  I’ll make this short and to the point for you.  Think of history like a line of dominoes.  At the end of the dominoes is the Boston Tea Party, for instance, and several other dominoes have to fall before that Tea Party clinks to the floor.  To fully understand that final domino, we need to see about the ones that come before it.  A major toppling piece that ran its way into Boston Harbor that night was the French and Indian War.  Without the French and Indian War there may not have been taxes such as the Townshend Acts or the Stamp Act, leading to the Tea Act that turned the harbor into brew.  So, let’s start at the beginning.


By: Alistair Flush, Military Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Tuesday, April 24, 2007

Time for Tea!

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Hey History Heads, it’s new topic time.  I went back and forth, forth and back with the other Historians about how to start the topic of the Boston Tea Party.  It seems pretty obvious to me how to start it.  Begin just like millions throughout the world begin their own days: with a steaming mug of tea!  What is tea and why begin with it?  It is important to begin with it because the power of tea led to a major gamble by Great Britain.  They thought that the pesky colonists were so addicted to their tea, that they would pay any price.  Well, after this topic you will see how the gamble paid off.  So, let’s get started with some steaming tea.  I like mine with a little lemon.


By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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