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Topic: THE JAY TREATY

On November 19, 1794, Supreme Court Justice John Jay's treaty between the United States and Great Britain was signed. Friction between the two countries existed since the end of the Revolutionary War. Was signing The Jay Treaty the only way for President Washington to avoid a second war with Great Britain? Would President Washington survive the intense opposition to the treaty in America? Find out this month on Superhero Historians.

Monday, January 28, 2008

Jay Treaty Wrap Up

Pierce Hawking, The Founding Father

We hope that you’ve enjoyed the Jay Treaty topic.  The Jay Treaty was a major decision for President Washington.  It was an unpopular decision with a lot of Americans and further split politics between Federalists and Democratic - Republicans.

Special thanks to all of our sources:
The Library of Congress www.loc.gov
Presidential Courage by Michael Beschloss
Online Library of Liberty www.oll.libertyfund.org
National Archives @ http://archives.gov/
Miller Center of Public Affairs www.millercenter.virginia.edu
Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 30 April 1796 [electronic edition]. Adams Family Papers: An Electronic Archive. Massachusetts Historical Society. http://www.masshist.org/digitaladams/

By: Pierce Hawking, The Founding Father
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Tuesday, January 22, 2008

Farewell

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

President Washington was successful in getting the Jay Treaty passed.  He pushed it through.  However, the fight over the treaty had worn the first president down.  He would not run for president again.  Remember, back then there were no term limits on the Presidency.  Washington’s dream of no political parties was gone.  Democratic - Republicans did not praise Washington’s time as president, only his actions beforehand.  By the end of his term only Federalists were in his Cabinet.  Only Federalists.


By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Thursday, January 17, 2008

Fisher Ames

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

The fight in the House of Representatives over the Jay Treaty was vicious.  A historic moment came on April 28, 1796 when Fisher Ames gave a speech supporting the treaty.  Fisher Ames was a Representative from Massachusetts.  A Federalist who supported the Jay Treaty, Ames gave his speech while suffering from bad health.  John Adams tells his wife about the speech in a letter only days after.

Mr. Ames, the day before Yesterday in his feeble State, Scarcely able to stand upon his Legs and with much difficulty finding Breath to utter his Periods, made one of the best Speeches he ever produced to the most crouded Audience ever assembled. He was attended to with a silence and Interest never before known and he made an Impression that terrified the hardiest and will never be forgotten. Judge Indel and I happened to sit together. Our feelings beat in Unison. My God! How great he is says Indel? He is delightful Said I—presently gracious God! Says Indel how great he has been”? He has been noble, said I. After some time Indel breaks out Bless my stars I never heard any thing so great since I was born! It is divine said I.

Adams was angered that Democratic - Republicans even made the speech necessary.

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By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Monday, January 14, 2008

Democratic - Republican Opposition

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

The Democratic - Republicans tried a lot of things to stop the Jay Treaty.  Some of it was personal towards President Washington.  The House of Representatives tried to hold back the money needed for the treaty.  This amount was $90,000.  The Democratic - Republicans in the House of Representatives stopped recognizing President Washington’s birthday.  But, their big attempt to stop the Jay Treaty was when the House of Representatives requested all paperwork related to the Jay Treaty.


By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Tuesday, January 08, 2008

Return of the Roman

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

Remember how political writers “back in the day*” used different names when they wrote something?  Benjamin Franklin wrote as Silence Dogood* and Alexander Hamilton wrote the Federalist Papers under the name Publius.  The battle over the Jay Treaty once again brought out the Roman in Alexander Hamilton.  He wrote a series of arguments for the treaty under the name Camillus.  Then he responded to his arguments under the name Philo Camillus.  I don’t know about you, but I think that’s pretty awesome.


By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Monday, January 07, 2008

The Cabinet

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

Let’s take a quick look at President Washington’s Cabinet.  He relied on their advice about the Jay Treaty.


By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Friday, January 04, 2008

Fellow Citizens

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

President George Washington wanted a government free from political parties.  This dream quickly vanished under Hamilton’s Federalists and Jefferson’s Democratic - Republicans.  However, President Washington governed as best as he could for the good of the entire country.  Before taking action on the Jay Treaty, President Washington sought the advice and consent of the Senate and the opinions of his Cabinet.  The following letter to the Selectmen of Boston, shows the President’s thoughts.


By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Wednesday, January 02, 2008

Washington’s Secret

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

President Washington knew that the American public would be against the Jay Treaty.  He wanted the Senate to be able to discuss the treaty without public outcry.  So he told his Secretary of State to keep the treaty a secret.  That didn’t last long.


By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Monday, December 31, 2007

Voting for Jay

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

This is the kind of stuff I love.  It’s why I’m a member of the Superhero Historians.  Check it out.  When President Washington wanted to appoint John Jay to negotiate the treaty with Great Britain, there was opposition.  The Federalists were aligned more with Great Britain.  The Democratic - Republicans were more on the side of France.  Aaron Burr, remember him, was a Democratic - Republican.  He moved to vote that sending Jay was unnecessary and that he would have to resign from the Supreme Court first.  Here is the actual vote!  Burr’s motion failed.  Count it up for yourself.

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By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Thursday, December 20, 2007

Baron Grenville

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

There is an interesting connection between the two men who negotiated the Jay Treaty.  America’s John Jay and Great Britain’s Baron William Grenville both struck major blows against slavery.  Remember our post on John Jay and his fight to make slavery illegal in New York?  Well Baron Grenville succeeded in passing a law abolishing the British slave trade in 1807.

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By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Monday, December 17, 2007

Avoiding War

Alistair Flush, Military Historian

Listen up.  I’ll keep this short and to the point.  The shadow of war hovered over the Jay Treaty in 1794.  The United States was still fragile.  President Washington did not want to risk another war with Great Britain.  At the time of the treaty, Great Britain and France were waging war.  Great Britain did not want the United States trading with France.  As a result, they seized American ships bound for France.


By: Alistair Flush, Military Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Wednesday, December 12, 2007

France

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

When talking about the beginning of the United States of America, a few other countries keep coming up.  The first, Great Britain, is obvious.  The other country is France.  The other thing that keeps popping up is Thomas Jefferson favoring France while Alexander Hamilton favored Great Britain.  I’ll let Dean and Phineas take care of the politics and people involved.  I want to talk a little about France.


By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Monday, December 10, 2007

Treaty of Paris

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

The Treaty of Paris, signed in 1783, ended the Revolutionary War.  But, it didn’t end the problems between the United States and Great Britain.  Not at all.  After the Treaty of Paris, tensions between the two countries kept burning.  So, let’s take a look at the Treaty of Paris so we can understand the Jay Treaty. 


By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Wednesday, December 05, 2007

John Jay

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

Who is this mysterious “Jay” and why is there a treaty named after him.  Well, he’s not that mysterious of a guy.  His full name is John Jay.  He was one of our Founding Fathers.  He may be one of those Founding Fathers you don’t hear too much about.  Let’s change that.


By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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Monday, December 03, 2007

Senate Approves

Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian

Here is a copy of the Senate’s resolution to pass The Jay Treaty.  This copy was sent to President Washington on June 24, 1795.  Pretty neat!  This is just to get you ready for this topic.  There is a ton of great stuff, especially letters that zipped around the Colonies about The Jay Treaty.

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By: Rhonda Rodentilly, Document Historian
Topic: THE JAY TREATY
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