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AMELIA EARHART
On July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart flew away from a town called Lae in the South Pacific. Earhart was attempting to circumnavigate the globe. After taking off from Lae, she disappeared. The Superhero Historians will investigate her life, her final flight, and the possible outcomes to that flight.
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Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY

On December 16, 1773 Bostonians rebelled against the Tea Act by boarding British ships carrying tea and dumping the cargo into the harbor. Find out who was behind this, why they did it, what the results were, and why some of them dressed like American Indians.

Monday, July 02, 2007

Boston Tea Party Wrap-Up

Pierce Hawking, The Founding Father

We hope that you have enjoyed our segment on the Boston Tea Party.  For any information about sources, click on the sidebar Sources tab.  For any other questions or comments, feel free to contact the Superhero Historians.  The Boston Tea Party is a huge topic and we hope that you do some more reading and research on it.

Check back this week for our new topic!

By: Pierce Hawking, The Founding Father
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Wednesday, June 27, 2007

Return to the French and Indian War

Alistair Flush, Military Historian

Listen up. I told you before that I would return a bit to the French and Indian War. Remember that George Washington gained military experience from this war. It is important to note that the Battle of the Great Meadows was the only battle in history where George Washington surrendered.

Washington commanded 400 troops and built Fort Necessity during this early battle.  After a day of attempted defense, he surrendered on July 4, 1754. Yes, July 4. What did this experience of surrender teach Washington? In the Revolutionary War he faced disastrous circumstances and refused to surrender. History is always connected.


By: Alistair Flush, Military Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Monday, June 25, 2007

Intolerable Acts Part 4

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

The final Intolerable Act dealt with all 13 Colonies and not just Massachusetts.  Not just Massachusetts.  It was called the Quartering Act.  This act said British soldiers were to be housed in private homes, in addition to empty and commercial buildings.  This was a change to an already existing Quartering Act.  The existing act stated that colonists needed to make room for soldiers in empty and commercial dwellings.  Think taverns and such.  Now soldiers were to be boarding at the actual homes of the colonists!  Right, smack-dab in their homes.

By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Friday, June 22, 2007

Intolerable Acts Part 3

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

The Boston Port Act is the third Intolerable Act we will cover.  The Port Act is very basic.  British Parliament closed down Boston’s port until the city repaid the money lost from the Boston Tea Party.  Britain lost money on customs and the East India Company lost their money in the big drink.  Sploosh.  Remember, Ben Franklin wanted the money repaid as well.  Every last cent repaid (or pound sterling).  Let’s see, get out your calculators: 342 crates of tea… carry the 1… move the decimal point… about £9,659.  This act backfired in a way.  The other colonies started sending supplies to Massachusetts and this helped bring together all of the colonies.

By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Wednesday, June 20, 2007

Intolerable Acts Part 2

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

The Administration of Justice Act was another one of the Intolerable Acts passed by Great Britain.  This act deals with courts and justice.  It stated that trials would not be taken care of locally.  Instead the Governor could send the trials to Great Britain or other British Colonies to be seen in front of a British judge and jury.  Can you imagine what effect that had on justice?  Colonists could count on any decision to be pro-British!  Any British official who acted out against the colonists could be saved by a British court decision.

Are you seeing anything in these Intolerable Acts?  Keep in mind the liberties that the United States hold very high and you will see how they combat governing like the Intolerable Acts.

By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Monday, June 18, 2007

Intolerable Acts Part 1

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

The Intolerable Acts are split into four different acts.  The one we are going to go over today is the Massachusetts Government Act. 


By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Friday, June 15, 2007

The Fiddler

Alistair Flush, Military Historian

The British may have sat around for three hours doing nothing while colonists dunked East India Company tea into the harbor, but they didn’t wait long to react after the last tea leaf drowned.  While walking away from the wharf the partygoers heard British Admiral Montague yell, “"Well boys, you have had a fine, pleasant evening for your Indian caper, haven’t you? But mind, you have got to pay the fiddler yet!” The fiddler was British Parliament.  The song they played was the Intolerable Acts.

The Intolerable Acts included the Massachusetts Government Act, Administration of Justice Act, Boston Port Act, and the Quartering Act.  Phineas will go over these one by one in the following days.

By: Alistair Flush, Military Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Wednesday, June 13, 2007

How much tea?

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

The Boston Tea Party destroyed 342 chests of tea. The East India Company claimed to have lost £9,659, which would equal around a million smackaroos today. That is a big statement by the colonists and a huge loss for the East India Company. The statement got its exclamation point the following day when colonists drifted around the harbor in boats, beating any floating tea with their oars.

As a little side note, Benjamin Franklin wanted the lost money to be repaid.

By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Monday, June 11, 2007

Orderly Tea Party

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

For an act of rebellion, the Boston Tea Party was orderly.  The Party was a well-planned event, not a scramble of colonists running out at the last minute to do damage.  No last minute damage. Remember that December 16 was the final day for the colonists to do anything.  They wanted to make a statement.  The best way to make that statement was to be in control.


By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Thursday, June 07, 2007

Mohawk Indians

Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian

The Boston Tea Party was a masterpiece of political protest.  Saying “no” to authority by dumping tea into the harbor was brilliant.  Brilliant.  Most of the descriptions of the Tea Party say that participants dressed themselves as Mohawk Indians.  But did they?

Here are some accounts of the Tea Party and what they have to say about the “Mohawk Indians.”


By: Phineas Pollyphus, Political Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Wednesday, June 06, 2007

Old South Meeting House

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

Sorry for the break in posting.  We had some things to take care of here at Superhero Historians.  The good news is that we are back.

Last time we talked about Faneuil Hall.  Remember the weather vane?  The colonists moved the meetings from Faneuil Hall because of space issues.  More citizens than expected showed up to the meetings, so the hall filled up and they moved it.  How great is that?  Everyone involved in the Tea Party must have been thrilled.  A meeting hall crammed, busting at the seams with colonists, showed tremendous support against British taxation.  The meetings moved to the Old South Meeting House.


By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Friday, June 01, 2007

Samuel Adams

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

It is likely that you have heard of Samuel Adams.  He was a cousin to John Adams, POTUS* number two.  He was also a major figure in the politics of the revolution.  He is believed to have played a big part in the formation of the Boston Tea Party.


By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Wednesday, May 30, 2007

Faneuil Hall

Barley Hugg, Location Historian

The Dartmouth sat docked in the harbor while the other ships carved their way across the Atlantic.  You’ve read the handbill calling the meeting.  So let’s scurry to Faneuil Hall.  Remember, Faneuil Hall was to be the meeting place.  They moved from Faneuil Hall once the crowd became too large.


By: Barley Hugg, Location Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Thursday, May 24, 2007

Thomas Hutchinson

Dean Dillopolis, People Historian

I know the name Thomas Hutchinson rings a bell.  That’s right, we talked about him and Benjamin Franklin.  Good memory!  You get one “Deano Point.” Thomas Hutchinson was born in Boston and even graduated from Harvard, but was a Loyalist to Great Britain.  He spent most of his life in public service becoming the American colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1771 through 1774.  The Boston Tea Party happened during his time as governor.  What part did Thomas Hutchinson play in the Tea Party?


By: Dean Dillopolis, People Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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Wednesday, May 23, 2007

The Ships

Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian

Three ships stuffed with East India Tea were emptied out the night of the Boston Tea Party.  Did you know that a total of six ships left England to bring tea to the colonies?  The Dartmouth, Eleanor, Beaver, William, London, and Polly all set sail filled with tea for the colonists.  The London sailed for Charleston, while the Polly set course for Philadelphia.


By: Dorothy Duckinsie, Invention / Things Historian
Topic: BOSTON TEA PARTY
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